"Hearing one person tell their story gave a completely different perspective to what happened, as it wasn't about statistics or about a nation as a whole, but one person who lost his family and home." ~O. Avery (student)

Teacher and Student Comments

These are some select comments that teachers and students have made over the last several years attesting to our programs and presentations.

Leave your own comment or reaction

This is a teacher's reaction from Ronnie Breslow's presentation at New Hope-Solebury on April 13, 2010:

"What an incredible experience for our school community. Mrs. Breslow is a powerful speaker and a remarkable woman. Her presentation was honest and clear, it was inspiring and informative. Her message of survival and hope, of letting go of anger, of taking responsibility for our actions and inactions... Truly remarkable. Thank you so much for making these experiences possible." ~Joanne

These are some student reactions from Ruth Hartz's presentation at Visitation BVM School on January 12, 2009:

"Ms. Ruth, thank you for coming into our classroom and telling us your story. Thank you for the wonderful experience you gave me. You opened my eyes.  That was one experience I will never forget. I will cherish the memories you have brought into my mind, again thank you."

"Hello Ms. Ruth thank you so much for visiting us. You left me speechless about the things you told us. Thank you for taking time out of your schedule to tell us about the events in your lifetime."

This is a teacher's reaction from Hans Salomon's presentation at the Holocaust Awareness Museum to 6th graders on January 29, 2008:

"...I would really recommend this trip to any school studying this period in history..." ~Shelby

Here are some student letters from Ronnie Breslow's presentation at the C.W. Henry school on June 3, 2009:

"...It was like the history that I have been learning about for so long just, came alive. ...Her presence impacted me because my generation is the last one that will be able to actually see, touch, and hear her voice one on one." ~Justin

"...What I've learned from your visit is you should always stand up for your rights and others. ...From hearing your story I have made it my own duty to seek out any injusttice and stop it at the roots. Sitting and watching it fester will only repeat history. I want to thank you for presenting me with this wonderful opportunity and experience. You have changed my outlook on life." ~Nanya


Here are some student letters from Kurt Herman's presentation to eighth graders at the St. Francis De Sales school on October 27, 2004:
"...You will always be in my prayers. One day I'll be able to teach and tell your stories to others and they'll teach and tell it too, and so on. May God bless you Mr. Herman." ~Christina

...It was an honor to hear your story. And you helped me realize how good I have it here in the United States..." ~Travis

"...Because of your story, I will always be grateful to have so much freedom..." ~Tyhere

"...I heard lots of stories about people during the Holocaust, but most of them were very sad because most of their family members died in Nazi camps....You must have been really lucky to see almost all of your family in America again..." ~Kyesha

Here is a student's reaction to Kurt Herman's presentation to 7th graders at the Austin Meehan Middle School on April 14, 2009:
"..."Knowing that you went through something so scary and sad and can still look on the bright side of everything truly touched my heart. ...No matter what happens you should never look at the cup half empty but half full..." ~Bronte

Here are some student letters from Ronnie Breslow's to 7th graders at the Marlton Middle School on February 10, 2009:
..."In the future, kids will have to learn about the holocaust from text books but I can say that I have heard about it from a survivor. Thank you for sharing your story with me and my classmates..." ~Emily

"...There isn't a better person to hear this information from than someone who actually went through it..." ~Nick

"...After hearing your story we made peace-pledges on what we will do as an individual to stop intolerance. I hope people will actually realize we are all made equal. I hope to be a speaker to spread peace but I'm young and I need a lot of time. But I will not give up!..." ~Morgan

This is a teacher's reaction from Ilse Lindemeyer's presentation to 6th graders at Visitation BVM School on February 19, 2009:
"...I can't thank you enough for putting together our event with Ilse...They [the students] will never forget what they heard that day, and they will pass on Ilse's story so that it will be not lost..." ~Emily

This is a teacher's reaction from Hans Salomon's presentation to 7th and 8th graders at the Austin Meehan Middle School on May 1, 2008:

..."We would love to continue our relationship with your organization. It is so important that our students and faculty continue to hear the story so that it can continue to be told. Our students gained so much information from this presentation - they have told the story and will continue to do so." ~Maria and Sheryl

Here are some student's reactions to Michael Zal's presentation to 7th graders at the Marlton Middle School on February 26, 2008:

"...I get bullied at school. Your story showed me that I can do more than just stand there and get picked on. It showed me that I can do something. I can make a difference. Thank you for showing me that..." ~J.

Here is a student's reaction to a performance of Who Will Carry the Word in September 2009.

"...My name is Jordan. Firstly, I'd like to say it warms my heart and soul to know the work your museum does and the humanity you represent. Your message is powerful and needed, and I hope it never goes unappreciated.

...about a year ago, I had the privilege and honor of meeting one of your survivors, Itka Zygmuntowicz. One of my friends was in the Theatre Production "Who Will Carry The Word?" in Philadelphia, and I was in Philadelphia visiting so of course I went to see the show. I found a seat in the front row, and 15 minutes before curtain a woman sits a seat over from me. After a few minutes, she leans over and asks if she can sit next to me, and I said Of course, so she scooted the seat over and we began talking. We talked for about 10 minutes and she asked if I had seen the show before and I said no and asked her if she had. Her reply was, "I lived it". I hadn't put two together until she reached down and lifted up her sleeve, showing me the numbers on her arm.

Chills ran up my spine and I couldn't help but feel a deep empathy for this woman, what she had gone through, and how kind she was even still... So we watched the show and towards the end of the show at one of the most dramatic and intense moments, she reached over and held my hand very tightly. At this point I was overcome with emotion and could no longer hold back openly sobbing, along with others in the theatre. And Itka (Or as she allowed me to call her affectionately "Itkula")*not sure on spelling* reached over and held me as she also began to weep. After the show she gave a speech to the audience and read some of her heartbreaking and hopeful poetry. I talked with her briefly afterward and she gave me some of the most genuine, heartfelt, and sound advice, which I still hold dear... After that night I remained touched and honored to have met her, and I still feel it today.

I want to thank her for her words and for her survival to carry the word. It's something that I now carry as well and share with anyone who will listen... She will always have a place in my heart as one of the best examples of human compassion and empathy I've ever met. It brings me to tears to know and have experienced the fact that she followed the last words she heard from her Mother... "Don't become hateful and bitter... Don't let them destroy you". That was one of the most powerful nights of my life, and I feel it always will be.