"Hearing one person tell their story gave a completely different perspective to what happened, as it wasn't about statistics or about a nation as a whole, but one person who lost his family and home." ~O. Avery (student)

Great Music! Great Food! Great Fun!

The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center Presents...


Summer Music Festival


Sunday July 27th

Keneseth Israel (8339 Old York Rd, Elkins Park)

1pm-6pm

Price:
$10 in advance for Museum Members, seniors and students
$15 at the door
Children under the age of 12 are free!

1pm Doors Open
2pm Klezmer Performance by Bobby Block Trio
3:30pm Rak-Dan Israeli Dancing
5pm Steve "Schmidty" Schmidt and Justin "Rellik" Ginsberg

A variety of vendors will be selling food and merchandise. We will have face painting and raffles. This will have family fun for all!

Click here to reserve your $10 tickets in advance and save $5!

You may also RSVP to the Museum in advance: phone: 215-464-4701 Email: holocaustawarenessmuseum@gmail.com

All proceeds go towards supporting Holocaust Education in the Delaware Valley

Sponsored by Keneseth Israel; Law Offices of Freedman and Grinshpun; and Pete's Bargain Outlet

Confirmed Vendors:
Dave Karasow - Face Painting
Caricaturist
Garden of Earthly Delights
Gratz College
Kidstuff Klothes
Recycled Jewelry by Ava
Soaps by Georgette
Younique
Baskets by Gayle
Stephanie Feldman - Angel of Losses

Holocaust Education Bill Passes in Legislature, Awaits Corbett's Signature

From the Jewish Exponent

The Holocaust and genocide education bill passed unanimously in the state House on Monday, bringing it one step closer to state law.

The bill passed the House of Representatives with a 197-0 vote. Monday's vote follows last week unanimous passage in the state Senate. The measure now awaits Gov. Tom Corbett's signature, which is expected.

The legislation "strongly encourages" but does not require schools to teach Holocaust curriculum. That had been a sticking point for some Holocaust education advocates, but there appears to be greater consensus in the wake of the bill receiving bipartisan support in the Senate.

The legislation, initially proposed by Rep. Paul Clymer, a Republican from Bucks County, calls for providing teachers with Holocaust education and training; establishes a statewide study to determine which schools are teaching the Holocaust and calls for the State Department of Education to require schools to offer such instruction if, after two years, fewer than 90 percent of schools are teaching the subject. It also directs the Department of Education to create a statewide curriculum with the help of organizations like the Shoah Foundation.

Chuck Feldman, president of the Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center at the Klein JCC, had been among those who saw a mandate as essential for the bill to be effective.

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